7 янв. 2014 г.

Bible study | Observation

26 items you could look for in your observation of the passage

Ask the six vital observation questions: What? Who? Where? When? Why? and How?
Look for key words.
Look for repeated words and phrases.
Look for questions being asked.
Look for answers being given.
Look for commands.
Look for warnings.
Look for comparisons–things that are alike.
Look for contrasts–things that are different.
Look for illustrations.
Look for causes and effects and reasons for doing things.
Look for promises and their conditions for fulfillment.
Look for lists of things.
Look for results.
Look for advice, admonitions, and attitudes.
Look for the tone of the passage–emotional atmosphere.
Look for explanations.
Look for Old Testament quotes in the New Testament.
Look for the paradoxes.
Look for exaggeration.
Look for connectives (and, or, but, therefore etc.)
Look for the force of the verbs
Look for words and phrases to reveal feelings.
Look for anything unusual or unexpected.
Look at the grammatical construction of the sentences.
Look at the use of current events of the times.

2 янв. 2014 г.

Inductive Bible Study. General Overview



I. Observation

A. Survey the book-as-a-whole
  1. Identify the general materials of the book (biographical, ideological, historical, geographical, chronological).
  2. Locate the major units and subunits in the book and identify the main structural relationships operative in the book-as-a-whole.
  3. Ask a few interpretative questions based on each major structural relationship observed.
  4. Identify the key verses and strategic areas that provide insight into the book-as-a-whole.
  5. Identify higher-critical data.
  6. Note other major impressions relating to the book-as-a-whole.
B. Survey individual sections or segments
  1. Locate the major units and subunits within the section or segment and the main structural relationships operative in the section or segment-as-a-whole.
  2. Ask a few interpretative questions based on each major structural relationship observed.
  3. Identify the key verses and strategic areas that provide insight into the section or segment-as-a-whole.
  4. Identify the literary form(s) employed in the section or segment.
  5. Identify other major impressions.
C. Observe significant elements within individual paragraphs and verses, employing either detailed observation or detailed analysis of the passage, and ask detailed interpretive questions based upon these observations.

II. Interpretation

A. Answer the most significant questions raised in the observation of paragraphs and verses
  1. Identify the most significant questions asked based on importance, difficulty and interests.
  2. Note the types of evidence available for answering each interpretive question and employ this evidence to answer each question selected.
B. Integrate the answers to the questions in the progressive fasion so as to interpret the paragraph, next the segment, then the section, and ultimately the book-as-a-whole. This process may involve answering questions raised during the survey of sections, segments, and books.

III. Evaluation and Appropriation

A. Find the truths or principles that can legitimately be applied to contemporary times and places other than the original scriptural settings.
B. Relate these truths or principles to appropriate contemporary situations so as to inform your response to the contemporary issue or problem.

IV. Correlation

A. Relate the book's theology to the teaching of other biblical materials by the same author.
B. Relate the book's theology to the New Testament-as-a-whole (or to the Old Testament-as-a-whole).
C. Relate the book's theology to the Bible-as-a-whole, thus developing a biblical theology.

From Bauer, David R, and Robert A Traina. Inductive Bible Study: A Comprehensive Guide to the Practice of Hermeneutics. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2011, pp.73-74.